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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
's a street party that continues on now for several days since mr. mandela's death was announced on thursday evening here. the street has been filling with marchers, with choirs, with schoolchildren, with ordinary people who have come from far and near to be here, to be part of a celebration of mr. mandela's life. all of this is perhaps a day of anticipation because tomorrow about a mile or so from here, that huge soccer stadium that seats some 80,000 people, there will be countless people gathering to come to mourn, to come and breathe and celebrate mr. mandela's life. it may be the largest organization ever, perhaps rivaling the services for pope john paul ii when there were 70 heads of state, kings and queens. we are hearing there will bow 50 or 60 heads of state. leaders from as far away as new zealand and australia also coming here. although the american delegation, as you mentioned, which was scaled down based on the wishes of the south african government, they are trying to limit this. there is just a huge outpouring for mr. mandela and literally the world wants to be here. millions m
in johannesburg. byron? >> reporter: it's a bit loud here on the street outside of mr. mandela's home. people singing songs and chants from the movement mr. mandela lead here decades ago. all day long here, a steady stream of humanity, as people have shown up, sometimes entire families. here, we show their last respect to the man this entire nation so adored. as the world mourns the death of nelson mandela through song, dance and tears, details about his grand state funeral are coming out. >> we should all work together to organize the most befitting funeral. >> reporter: beginning tomorrow with a national day of prayer and reflection, for south africa. with an official service on tuesday in johannesburg, where thousands are expected to gather at the fnb stadium, the same stadium where mandela made his last public appearance during the 2010 world cup. the services are expected to be the largest in generations, with prominent leaders and dignitaries from across the globe attending, including president obama and the first lady, who travel to south africa next week, to pay respects, bringing alo
. i was the wife of a south african freedom fighter, belonged to a rival organization than mr. mandela's. my husband was a pat, pan african congress, mr. mandela was founder of anc, african national congress, others south african national union. i was used to those men and a few women shouting and screaming at each other. they were really arch rivals. when mr. mandela came, he didn't raise his voice. he didn't argue with anybody. he didn't put anybody down. they were rivals. i had never met a south african who wasn't shouting and really angry all the time. i know he was angry, but he didn't use his energy foolishly. so it was a year after that he was imprisoned. i became friends with his wife then, winnie mandela. and we continued to support each other over the years and over the oceans. and she would tell me how he was. he wasn't vitt uperative with t guards. i was part of hillary clinton's delegates when he was inaugurated. i sat there and watched the guards, who had guarded him for 27 years, sitting in the right sights, in the best seats, invited by mr. mandela. not to say look how
coming here throughout the past few days since mr. mandela's death was announced. they have been singing in the streets, they have been chanting. it's been more street party than anything else celebrating the life of mr. mandela. obviously there's also some grief and mourning but most people are trying to focus on the positive, the legacy and the tremendous achievement of mr. mandela and this country during his life. also you have to remember that all these events are taking place over a week. there's the memorial service tomorrow and then for the next three days after that, mandela's body will lie in state at the union builds, the seat of government in pretoria and the body will make a procession from the military hospital to that place each day so there will be people trying to line that route and see what's happening as well to visit the body and pay their respects. and finally the funeral in a distant part of the country where mr. mandela is from, so many events over many days and a lot of emotion overall that. >> ron, thank you. checking the news feed this morning, that massive wint
comparisons with mr. mandela. mr. obama often noted privately and publicly that his sacrifices would never compare to mr. mandela's. aide to mr. obama said he was uncomfortable when people drew parallels between them as often as they did. this is from "the new york time times", not "the washington post." i apologize. how fair are those comparisons? they are inevitable and now we're going to continue to read and hear more about them over the next few days and weeks. how fair are they? >> it depends on which mr. mandela you're talking about. >> and which mr. obama you're talking about. >> one of the things that we talk about is mr. mandela as a tremendous humanitarian leader and so on. and he really was. but he was also a politician. and he also had to hold together a coalition, find the way to steer his country forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you sa
but not forgotten. ♪ free free nelson mandela >> mr. nelson mandela will be released. >> good evening. this is nelson mandela's first full day of freedom. >> reporter: released at the age of 72 in 1990. he remained ever vigilant that his country and its freedoms rested in the hands of the people. >> i stand here before you, not as a prophet. but as a humble servant. >> reporter: and for the people of south africa, mandela's release after nearly 30 years of imprisonment ushered in a new era of hope and the end of apartheid. >> today, the majority of south africans, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. >> reporter: in 1993, mandela, along with south africa's president, f.w. de klerk, won the nobel peace prize. and in 1994, mandela's dream was realized when black south africans cast their first ballots in a democratic election. and mandela became south africa's first black president. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight. but now, this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years -- >> afri
. every day here in south africa, until mr. mandela is finally laid to rest. >> a man who changed the world. >>> our ron claiborne has covered nelson mandela extensively throughout the years. >> ron has had many experiences and memories. and is here with a personal take on the story. >> when you cover a story or a person, it requires professional detachment. we're supposed to stand back, observe and report. for nelson mandela, it was difficult for me personally, because something kept getting in the way. the fact that i admired the man deeply. the first time i saw nelson mandela was at yankee stadium in 1990. six months after he had been released from prison. i was in awe, probably we all were. but then he did something that charmed all of us. >> you now know who i am. i am a yankee. >> reporter: as a college student, i read about this man serving a life sentence for fighting against apartheid. i was fired up by the slogan, free mandela. years later, at abc, i traveled to south africa to embezzle his birthplace and qunu, where he you up as a small child. and where he will be burie
will remember most about mr. mandela that his spirit could not be restrained by economic injustices, metal bars, or the burden of hate and revenge. he taught us forgiveness on a grand scale. he was a spirit born free destined to soar above the rainbows. statement by mohammed ali. i want to bring on nbc's ron allen. he covered nelson mandela's 1994 election, and he's been back to south africa five times since 2011. thank you for being with me tonight. you were there in '94. i was there as an observer, an activist. you as a journalist. i was in the city of johannesbu johannesburg. give people a sense. i understand the greatness of nelson mandela. you have to understand that moment. the african -- the black african had never been able to vote before in south africa. >> right. >> give us a sense of what it was like in durbin in the non-city areas. >> right. this was a very rural area and we were beyond the city. and there were polling places that were essentially huts. and it was a very misty, foggy morning. and i can remember seeing these huts and these lines that stretched for literally for miles
and mrs. bush. >>> another former president is remembering mandela today. president bill clinton, who talked with the anchor of this week, george stephanopoulos. >> he once told me that he lived on hatred, when he went into prison. he said after 11 years he realized that they had taken about everything they could take from him except his mind and heart. he said, i realized that those are things you have to give away, and i decided not to give them away. >> mahatma gandhi, abe lincoln, george washington. he belongs in that group. >> he does. you know, in my lifetime, gandhi and mandela, in no small measure, because of their willingness to give up the comforts of ordinary life, they symbolize the world we'd all like to live in, if we could just be a little bigger, if we could be a little more like them. >> president clinton with george stephanopoulos, president clinton once asked mandela if he still hated his oppressors, mandela answered, nope, they had me 27 years in prison, if i hated them when i walked out the door, they would still have me. >>> and now, we turn next to what was a bi
in johannesburg. mandela made his last public appearance at the 2010 world cup. it's confirmed, president obama and the first lady will be there, along with former president george w. bush and mrs. bush. former president jimmy carter and former president bill clinton and mrs. clinton are expected at the funeral next sunday. wednesday through friday, he will lie in state in the nation's legislative capital. next sunday, the state funeral in his hometown on the eastern cape. his long-time friend and lawyer, george bizos. >> he will go down in history, i think, as the revolutionary who didn't believe in violence. >> reporter: earlier today, we had our first public sighting of winnie mandela, his former wife and partner in the dark days of apartheid. tomorrow will be quiet. on tuesday, the gathering like the world has never seen before, as dignitaries from around the globe gather to say farewell to nelson mandela. bianna? >> a week of mourning, reflection, and celebration. our thanks to you. >>> nelson mandela has a large and complicated family tree with over a dozen grandchildren. some of them ope
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)